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Describe your pre-med schedule, typical day and week
Ia typical med school day is 8 to 5. After class, lecture, or clinic I study for two hours. I then usually work on dissecting the cadaver which is available to us at our school 24 hours a day average between three and four hours of studying each day.

Taylor Y Stauffer at Emory University School of Medicine (MD), class of 2016.
Pre-med: Edgewood College, Biology degree. Answer posted 3/25/2014
It varied a lot year by year. I do have to say that sophomore year was the hardest. I was taking Genetics, Organic Chemistry, and Accounting. I was also an officer in one organization, active in another, tutoring and volunteering. It was busy.

Jennifer Hsu at University of North Texas Health Science Center - Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine at Ft Worth (UNTHSC-TCOM) (DO), class of 2018.
Pre-med: University of Texas at Austin, B.B.A. Management Info Systems degree. Answer posted 3/29/2014
Mon- class, research, study Tues- class, extra curriculars, study wed- class, volunteer, study thrus- class, research, extra curriculars, study frid - class, research, fun Sat- volunteer, study, fun Sun- study all day. I tried to keep myself pretty busy during the semester. I always tried to schedule my classes early so I would have the rest of the day to fufill my other obligations. Once class was over, I was studying and if I wasn't studying, I was doing research, if I wasn't doing research, I was either volunteering or participating in one of my extra-curriculars. I didn't have time to horse around. I saved Fri and Sat evenings to relax, workout and to go out and have fun with friends.

Iggy at State University of New York Upstate Medical University College of Medicine (MD), class of 2013.
Pre-med: University of Maryland- College Park, Biology and American Studies degree. Answer posted 1/4/2009
Moday-My Daughter, School, Work, My Daughter, and Study Time. Tuesday-My Daughter, School, Work, My Daughter, and Study Time. Wednesday-My Daughter, School, Work, My Daughter, and Study Time. Thursday-My Daughter, School, Work, My Daughter, and Study Time. Friday-My Daughter, School, Work, My Daughter, and Study Time. Saturday-My Daughter Sunday-My Daughter and Study Time

James Tolbert at Harvard Medical School (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: Harvard University, B.S. Chemistry & Biology degree. Answer posted 10/23/2008
nothing is typical for premed, now med school is a different story

Yusuf Ali at University of Maryland School of Medicine (MD), class of 2012.
Pre-med: Morgan State University, Biology degree. Answer posted 6/13/2008
Although many of the courses were strenuous, I kept a daily list of everything I planned to do each day with times alloted for each activity. By sticking to a schedule like that, I typically had about 5 nights a week totally free to do whatever I wanted. Time management is everything. So on any given day, an example would be: class 10-2, work 2-4, homework 4-630, gym 630-8, dinner 8-9.

Sandro Corti at UMDNJ--New Jersey Medical School (), class of .
Pre-med: Answer posted 3/24/2008
Monday, Wednesday: Work 6 AM-9AM,Class 9 AM-12 PM, Lunch 12 PM-1 PM, Lab 1 PM-4 PM, Work 6 PM-10 PM Tuesday: Work 6 AM-10 AM, Lab 10 AM-12 PM, Lunch 12 PM-1 PM, Class 2 PM-4 PM, Dance 4 PM-6 PM, Work 6 PM-10 PM Thursday: Work 6 AM-10 AM, Lab 10 AM-12 PM, Lunch 12 PM-1 PM, Class 2 PM-4 PM, Work 4 PM-10 PM Friday: Class 9 AM-12 PM, Lunch 12 PM-1 PM, Work 1 PM -6 PM Saturday: Work 8 AM-1 PM Sunday: Work 2 PM-6 PM I had club meetings most days during Lunch and Dinner. I worked as an RA one night a week and one weekend a month 8 PM-8 AM. This is a pretty typical schedule for me.

Lynn at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) (DO), class of 2010.
Pre-med: Cedar Crest, Genetic Engineering degree. Answer posted 6/19/2006
I've been out of school for about six years. But I did take 12 credits last summer (just for kicks?) while I was working full-time and part-time jobs and starting the application process. I'd study a couple hours each night, and revise an essay or two, but always left room for some exercise and quality time with my "family" (fiance and two cats). It's all about balancing your load, or you'll collapse under the weight of it.

Sarah Levin at Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine of Midwestern University (AZCOM) (DO), class of 2011.
Pre-med: Wesleyan University, Neuroscience & Behavior degree. Answer posted 11/26/2006
Let's see, classes in the morning (eg 8-12). Lunch and nap time (12-2). Afternoons volunteering 2-3xwk or playing, rehearsing drums (I was in a blues/rock band). Evenings alternated with work and time with friends and family (please make time for friends/family!!). Nights studying about 3-4 hrs (eg 8-11/12). My weekends were spent working all day, but partying like a rock star at night lol. This schedule worked for me, but everyone is different. Just make sure you take time to smell the roses!

Maria Reyes at University of Utah School of Medicine (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: university of utah & westminster college (2nd BS), psychology & biology degree. Answer posted 5/10/2007
Class every day...labs 2 or 3 times a week...you all know what I'm talking about. Don't forget to take other classes too...I decided to study abroad my senior year and it was the best decision of my life.

George Dunham at St George's University School of Medicine (Caribbean), class of 2010.
Pre-med: Wake Forest University, Biology degree. Answer posted 5/2/2007
Go to class for maybe 1/4 of the day, sleep for 1/4 of the day, study for almost 1/2 the day and talk to my gf. During the week I would usually conduct research for a few hours a week. I went out with my gf on the weekends.

Brian Wolf at University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (MD), class of 2011.
Pre-med: University of Miami 07, B.A Psychology degree. Answer posted 7/8/2006
OH boy. Wake up at 6 am, and run. First class from 8 till 9. Hour break. 10 till 11 is another class. Monday and tuesday I serve in the non traditional student center. I go to the gym after that, then study for the mcat. On tuesdays, I have 2 labs, totalling 6 hours. Wednesdays, I hang out with my wife and son for a couple hours, before working a 12 hour graveyard shift. I work 4 12's a week, wed. thru sat. Sunday morning is church, sleep all day, and get ready to do it again. (I also run or go the gym tue, wed, thur, sat). I study when I can (at work is good since I work in a sleep lab).

Zack Gangwer at Arizona Podiatric Medicine Program (AZPod) at Midwestern University (Podiatry), class of 2011.
Pre-med: Weber State University, Microbiology/Clinical Laboratory Science degree. Answer posted 12/29/2006
Have class in the morning until noonish. Study in the afternoon and then have most nights free to hang out with friends.

Brian Dix at College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery (Podiatry), class of 2011.
Pre-med: South Dakota State University, BS Biology degree. Answer posted 12/20/2006
study class sleep x5 sleep drink sleep study

Paul Nielsen at New York Medical College (MD), class of 2010.
Pre-med: Cornell, Human Biology, Health, and Society degree. Answer posted 10/11/2006
During the school year: 14-16 credit hours per semester. I worked 20 - 35 hours per week to pay the bills.

Erik A. at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2010.
Pre-med: University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, B.S. Computer Science degree. Answer posted 8/17/2006
12 hour days with school, volunteer, shadowing, kids

Doug Christensen at Des Moines University - College of Osteopathic Medicine (DMU-COM) (Podiatry), class of 2011.
Pre-med: Loras, BA Secondary Education degree. Answer posted 10/10/2006
classes MWF and labs TR.. material was difficult but i managed to study less that most other premed student with similar results.

Ehren Dueweke at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2010.
Pre-med: Kalamazoo College, Chemistry degree. Answer posted 8/21/2006
Too long ago to remember. My best advice though is to enjoy you undergrad years and the time you have to play.

J Chang at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2007.
Pre-med: BYU, Neuroscience degree. Answer posted 7/28/2005
Typical undergrad school schedule (up to 18-20 credit hours). The rest of the time spent with the family and working on the house. Plenty of time to relax.

Bill Holmes at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: University of Arizona, Molecular & Cellular Bio/Anthropology degree. Answer posted 1/6/2006
I attended all of my classes, which usually lasted until about 2, 3, or 4 during my first 2 years. I got out earlier the last two years, but during those years I did have to fit in time for research, Circle K, and work at the library. I remember not really doing the required reading for my classes until it was time to write a paper or study for a test. Of course I am sure I will have to keep up in med school though! I really had plenty of free time to devote to Circle K and my boyfriend. I rarely did homework on the weekends until Sunday night. And I pulled a 3.85.

Dana Marie Smith at Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) (DO), class of 2010.
Pre-med: Ithaca College, B.A. Biology degree. Answer posted 6/24/2006
I had a fairly standard pre-med schedule with chemistry, biology, calculus, and english (humanities) during the first year. The second year consisted of physics and organic chemistry.

Andrew Doan, MD, PhD




Andrew Doan at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (MD), class of 2001.
Pre-med: Reed College, B.A. in Biology degree. Answer posted 6/11/2006
I did not have a typical day or week during undergraduate school. I did not have a regular study schedule. Some days I would not study at all and other days I would study all day long.

Scott Larson at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: Idaho State University, Microbiology degree. Answer posted 10/23/2005
Class from 8 - 3 Practice from 3 - 6 Study/Relax/Work 7-10

Robert Greenhagen at College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery (Podiatry), class of 2008.
Pre-med: Briar Cliff University, B.S. in Biology degree. Answer posted 5/30/2006
I went to school full time and worked 24 hours a week.

Matt Tallar at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: UW-Milwaukee, Microbiology/Biotechnology degree. Answer posted 2/7/2006
I took the required courses for medical school and others that I was interested in or that I thought might help me in the future. Abbreviated list of courses taken: zoology, physiology, anatomy, genetics, microbiology, cell biology, cancer biology, general chem., organic chem., quantitative chem., biochem., philosophy of science, psych., physiological psych., mythology in literature, speech, computing, sociolgy, medical terminolgy, clinical lab science, stats., calculus, all the general courses (GDR's), etc.

Joe Behn at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: University of Wisconsin--Stevens Point, Biology degree. Answer posted 1/4/2006
eh...usually freaking out (hahaha) and cramming in all my engineering homework before deadlines. right now i'm trying to balance a senior design project, honors thesis, job, and undone latin assignments. i reserve tues and thurs mornings for breakfast at a local bakery with my girlfriends. a good way to unwind and consume large amounts of caffeine.

emily at University of Mississippi School of Medicine (MD), class of 2011.
Pre-med: University of Mississippi, B.S. Chemical Engineering degree. Answer posted 3/20/2006
I never had a 'typical' day or week, some days I studied 14 hours straight, others I slept most of the day. The key is to know what makes you successful and to try to keep a balanced life!

Dina R at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science Chicago Medical School (MD), class of 2008.
Pre-med: University of Toronto, Hon BSc degree. Answer posted 3/19/2006
Study at least one hour a day, then, the day before the ole physics test, study hard from 7 pm to 7 am and go in at 8 am and take the test. Binge and Purge baby. You may not be able to walk straight the next day but you'll get that A.

Casey Lythgoe at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of .
Pre-med: B.Y.U.-Hawaii, Biochemistry degree. Answer posted 10/25/2005
In a typical day, I attended a couple of lectures in the morning, spent an hour or two volunteering around lunch, went to work building fences for a few hours in the afternoon, and then spent the evening with my wife. I was a procrastinator so I generally didn't study on a regular basis but crammed the night before a test.

Jeff Hanson at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: Utah State University, Biology degree. Answer posted 2/11/2006
Umm...it was pretty normal. As a BTS major I only took the required pre-med classes so for the most part I only had one lab a week. I study for a couple of hours a day then try to have some fun with the roommates.

Jeffrey Anderson at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: Bethel University, Biblical and Theological Studies degree. Answer posted 2/11/2006
Pretty variable, but I was usually in class from 9 or 10am until 2pm, occasionally 5pm on days with lab. Studied usually no more than a couple hours a day, and that's pushing it.

Marc Biedermann at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: University of Wisconsin - Green Bay, BS Human Biology Health Sciences degree. Answer posted 2/6/2006
It was normally pretty busy, as a chemistry major, I had lots of labs between physics and chemistry especially. I also took spanish and some non-required courses like anatomy and physiology for 'enjoyment' and preparation for medical school.

John Gannon at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of .
Pre-med: UCLA/ University of Utah, biological chemistry degree. Answer posted 1/10/2006
First quarter: about 8 hours of class and 4 hours of lab per week (Gen Chem w/lab and Trig). Second quarter: 16 hours of class and 12 hours of lab per week (Gen Chem II w/lab, Bio I w/lab, Pre-calc, Physics I w/lab) Third quarter: 16 hours of class and 16 hours of lab per week (Gen Chem III w/lab, Bio II w/lab, Calculus, Physics II w/lab) Summer: HELL!!! Organic Chemistry lecture 9 - 12 M-F, and lab 1-5 M,W,Th for 8 weeks. Fourth quarter: 12 hours of class, 7 hours of lab per week (Physics III w/lab, Biochem, Microbiology w/lab)

Amy Raubenolt at Ohio State University College of Medicine (MD), class of 2010.
Pre-med: Bowling Green State University, Spanish degree. Answer posted 1/13/2006
When I was in college, I had 8 o'clock classes all of the time and went most of the day. Then I would study a bit after that and try to be active in other activities. I didn't kill myself though because I knew that once I got to medical school I would be studying pretty much all of the time.

Adam Mehring at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) (DO), class of 2008.
Pre-med: Grove City College, Molecular Biology degree. Answer posted 1/10/2006
I am a fairly non-stop individual. I don't like to be bored so most of my time was filled with outdoors adventure stuff, studying, and work. I am still trying not to forget those I love in the world. Their company is priceless.

Aaron Beck at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: Concordia University Wisconsin, General Biology degree. Answer posted 1/3/2006
I always took approximately 15 credits (12 credits was full-time at my university) and worked an average of 12-15 hours/week. I usually studied outside of class between 2-3 hours per day, much more just prior to tests.

Jesse Stringer at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Biology degree. Answer posted 8/31/2005
I was a biomedical engineer so I had a lot of labs in undergrad (mostly electrical engineering) and design courses. I did not have to take many courses outside of my major to fulfill premed requirements.

Kim Bentley at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: Duke, Biomedical Engineering degree. Answer posted 10/31/2005
My schedule was a bit odd since I completed my BS degree in Zoology in 3 years instead of 4. Also, I have a large family, so I tried to spend some time with them. Overall, I tried to spend 8 am until 5 pm at school or in the library studying and then again from about 8 pm until 10 pm or 11 pm. The time from 6 pm (I also had to drive one hour each way to school and back) until 8 pm I tried to be home with the family. However, during my first semester, when I took 24 credits, I saw my family less than that. Also, before tests I saw them less than that in most of the other semesters with the exception of the two semesters following the MCAT and med school application. The first two years I did not work, but took a heavy load (18 credits) and maintained a GPA above 3.95. The last year, I took it a little easier, but worked part-time as well, so I worked some of the hours that I spent studying before. Overall, my last year was pretty relaxing and I spent more time with family as well. I always took my Sundays off to relax and managed to take some Saturdays off as well.

Christian Becker at Medical College of Wisconsin (MD), class of 2009.
Pre-med: Idaho State University, Zoology degree. Answer posted 7/26/2005




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